Scattered Rainstorms
stream of consciousness of an insane, wide-eyed bookworm.
"everything is surprising, rightly seen." -A.S. Byatt
Scattered Rainstorms
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"I like to watch people. Sometimes I ride the subway all day and look at them and listen to them. I just want to figure out who they are and what they want and where they’re going."
Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451 (via psych-facts)
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llingxling:

Seriously
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sheslikethestorm:

 
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"Start ignoring people who threaten your joy.
Literally, ignore them.
Say nothing.
Don’t invite any parts of them into your space."
Alex Elle (via insanity-and-vanity)
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aewgliriel:

brokenponycutiemark:

hideback:

Abandoned.
…Near the village of Braachaat, outside Antwerp, Belgium. The last photo shows a grotto-like cave under the mansion that may have been used as a bar in the past.
aewgliriel:

brokenponycutiemark:

hideback:

Abandoned.
…Near the village of Braachaat, outside Antwerp, Belgium. The last photo shows a grotto-like cave under the mansion that may have been used as a bar in the past.
aewgliriel:

brokenponycutiemark:

hideback:

Abandoned.
…Near the village of Braachaat, outside Antwerp, Belgium. The last photo shows a grotto-like cave under the mansion that may have been used as a bar in the past.
aewgliriel:

brokenponycutiemark:

hideback:

Abandoned.
…Near the village of Braachaat, outside Antwerp, Belgium. The last photo shows a grotto-like cave under the mansion that may have been used as a bar in the past.
aewgliriel:

brokenponycutiemark:

hideback:

Abandoned.
…Near the village of Braachaat, outside Antwerp, Belgium. The last photo shows a grotto-like cave under the mansion that may have been used as a bar in the past.
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artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,”Les Femmes D’Alger”.
Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.
Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by theie countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”
"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)
artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,”Les Femmes D’Alger”.
Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.
Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by theie countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”
"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)
artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,”Les Femmes D’Alger”.
Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.
Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by theie countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”
"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)
artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,”Les Femmes D’Alger”.
Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.
Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by theie countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”
"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)
artblackafrica:

Asad Faulwell draws attention to the women guerrilla combatants in Algeria’s War of Independence (1954-1962) through his work,”Les Femmes D’Alger”.
Faulwell was inspired by Gillo Pontecorvo’s film “The Battle of Algiers" (1966). In the movie, members of Algeria’s National Liberation Front (FLN) recruit three women to enact a terrorist attack in the French quarter of Algiers. "They recruited women because they could pass through check points without detection and would not raise suspicion when planting bombs," Faulwell explained.
Pontecorvo’s characters are based on real women: Djamila Bouhired, Zohra Drif and Hassiba Ben Bouali, all three of whom participated in the Algerian nationalist movement in the 1950s.

 ”In many ways these women were both victims and aggressors. They had killed civilians indiscriminately but they had also themselves been used by theie countrymen and brutally tortured by the French. They exist in a moral grey area.”
"I wanted to create a version of the ‘Les Femmes D’Alger’ series that was more applicable to modern society than the Orientalist works of the 19th and 20th century," - Faulwell (via HuffPost)
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kaleidosc0pe-dr3am:

becbluntsky:

mimi873:

siqenchy:

shit

ayeeee go Kylie😂✊👏lmao

Ya but holy fucking Kendall tho.

Fuk